ART EXBITION | Debuting September 2022, CALLED TO CREATE: BLACK ARTISTS OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH, The National Gallery of Art

UPCOMING EXHIBITION

CALLED TO CREATE:

BLACK ARTISTS OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH

THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

September 18, 2022 – March 26, 2023
East Building, Upper Level, West Bridge

Missouri Pettway, “Path through the Woods” (Quiltmaker’s Name), 1971, polyester knit, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons’ Permanent Fund and Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, 2020.28.16
Purvis Young, Saints, late 1970s, paint and wood on Mylar, mounted on wood, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons’ Permanent Fund and Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, 2020.28.30
Joe Light, Birdman Trainer, 1987, enamel on wood paneling, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons’ Permanent Fund and Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, 2020.28.37
Thornton Dial, Clothes Factory, 1995, mattress frame, rope, carpet, fabric, plastic, enamel, spray paint, industrial sealing compound on canvas mounted on wood, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Patrons’ Permanent Fund and Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, 2020.28.33

ABOUT EXHIBITION

For decades Thornton Dial, James “Son Ford” Thomas, Lonnie Holley, Mary T. Smith, Purvis Young, and many other Black artists in the South worked with little recognition, often using recycled materials as their art supplies and yards, porches, or boarded-up storefronts as their galleries. The women of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, made dazzling quilts from well-worn clothing or leftover scraps of fabric. Despite racism and other forms of discrimination, all of these artists drew on deep cultural and spiritual traditions to create some of the finest art of our time.

In 2020, the National Gallery acquired 40 sculptures, assemblages, paintings, reliefs, quilts, and drawings from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, and several related gifts have recently entered the collection as well. Enjoy these inventive works, including nine Gee’s Bend quilts, and learn the remarkable stories of their making and makers.

Artwork Courtesy of National Gallery of Art (Press)

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