ART SPACE | A REMIX OF PROGRESS: CHARLES ALSTON

“I don’t believe there’s a such a thing as ‘black art,’ though there’s certainly been a black experience. I’ve lived it. But it’s also an American experience.” – Charles Alston, African American Painter

From COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK:

Charles Henry Alston (1907-1977; Columbia College 1929, Teachers College 1931) was an influential painter during the Harlem Renaissance and the first African American supervisor for the Works Progress Administration. He supervised the WPA murals created at Harlem Hospital, leading a staff of 35 artists and assistants. Alston was also the first African American to teach at both the Museum of Modern Art and the Art Students League and, in 1969, to have been appointed the painter member of the Art Commission of the City of New York.

Alston was born in Charlotte, North Carolina, and was related to renowned artist Romare Bearden through his mother’s second marriage. He attended Columbia University as an undergraduate and graduate student, receiving a B.A. from Columbia College in 1929 and an M.F.A. from Columbia University’s Teachers College in 1931. After graduating he worked at the Harlem Arts Workshop, and when the program required more space, he secured an additional facility at 306 W. 141st St. The space, known as “306,” became a center for the Harlem art community.

Charles Alston Artwork | Public Domain

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